Galapagos wildlife

Galapagos Islands

Information
Facts
Archipelago
History
Geography
Weather
Darwin Foundation
Research Station
Marine Reserve
National Park
Plants
Map
More...

Tours

Galapagos Odyssey
Galapagos Christmas
Wildlife Odyssey
Galapagos Multisport

Activities

Scuba diving
Snorkeling
Sailing
Birding
Kayaking
Surfing
More...

Cruises

Galapagos Explorer
Alta
Beluga
Coral I
More...

Wildlife

Reptiles
Aquatic mammals
Birds
Marine life

Galapagos Islands land birds


Galapagos doves: The Galapagos dove (Zenaida galapagoensis) is an attractive bird. The upper parts are mainly a reddish brown with some black and white on the wings. The neck and breast are tinged with pink and the feet are bright red.

Galapagos vermilion flycatcher

The eye is surrounded by a spectacular bright blue ring. Below and behind the eye is a small black-bordered creamy stripe. To complete this magnificent plumage, both sides of the neck have an iridescent bronze-green patch. The juvenile plumage is much duller.

Galapagos hawks: While birds of prey (raptors), Galapagos hawks are mostly scavengers, feeding on carrion and playing a useful role in the ecosystem. It has exceptional vision, which refines its skill as a hunter. An endemic species, the Galapagos hawk has an interesting social mating and breeding system in which two or more males mate with a single female and help raise the young.

Galapagos hawk
The texts refer to this as cooperative polyandry behavior. What makes this behavior even more striking is that it has recently been reported that this unique breeding system is only used by the hawks on particular islands in the Galapagos.

Mockingbirds: The Galapagos mockingbirds are unusual in several respects. Belying their name (and differing from other mockingbird species), they do not mimic other birds.

In many ways, they seem to fill the niche left vacant by the absence of small land mammals. The Galapagos mockingbirds feed on insects, small lizards, young finches, carrion, as well as unprotected food. They tend to get around more by running than by flying. Their breeding behavior is communal, with several generations staying with and defending the family territory as well as assisting in the care and feeding of the juveniles.

Galapagos Islands land birds, Finches
»
Galapagos Islands tours
Galapagos Islands albatross video
Galapagos Islands shark video
Site map | About us | Contact us | Affiliate program | Advertising | List your business
Galapagos Islands Copyright © darwinadventure.com 2004 - 2010